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FDA Now Allowing Treatment of Coronavirus Using Plasma From Recovered Patients

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has updated its guidelines around the use of experimental remedies for the continuing COVID-19 pandemic to include use of “convalescent plasma,” in cases where the patient’s life is immediately threatened. This isn’t the approval of the procedure as a licensed treatment; however, rather an emergency approval that follows only on a case-by-case basis, and in extreme situations, as a means of helping additional analysis being executed into the possible efficacy of plasma collected from sufferers who have indeed contracted, and recovered from the novel Coronavirus.

FDA Now Allowing Treatment of Coronavirus Using Plasma From Recovered Patients

Plasma is an element of human blood — particularly the liquid part — which incorporates, among different things, antibodies that contribute to a body’s immune response. Use of plasma, via direct transfusion into a patient, like every other recommended vaccine for COVID-19 (and the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes it), has not undergone the medical research needed to indicate that it’s safe and efficient in combating the disease.

Regardless of a lack of completed medical trials, the FDA has granted this momentary authorization under its Investigational New Drug Applicants exclusion, in mild of the extent and nature of the present public health menace that COVID-19 represents. Several pre-clinical and clinical trials around the use of plasma from sufferers who’ve recovered are underway; however, there are some promising signs that convalescent plasma may undoubted;y be effective against SARS-CoV-2.